Kalroy Was Here

Eighth man from Adam, an artificer of metals

Sunday, August 01, 2010

Amazon.com: America, Why I Love Her: John Wayne: Music

Amazon.com: America, Why I Love Her: John Wayne: Music

This is the official Amazon review:

"This sentimentally over-the-top spoken-word recording was originally issued in 1973, during the height of Watergate and the final, unsettling days of the Vietnam War. In the wake of September 11, 2001, the John Wayne Estate reissued it on CD. And why not? Marion Morrison, a.k.a. John Wayne and the Duke, remains an enduring symbol of America--a country with an endlessly conflicted legacy of largely improvised symbolism, national myths, revised-on-a-dime history, and the freedom to make a buck on effusive patriotic rhetoric. Kitsch collectors may welcome the chance to own a true genre staple in digital sound, while others may yet find genuine solace in its orchestra-and-choir-backed oratory. With a poetic sensibility that seldom strays from the "Carolina pines/Appalachian mines" level of its opening verses, Wayne's processed voice (which betrays the health problems that would be his demise) expounds on topics that range from his homeland's undeniable natural beauty to his son's high school football career and the wisdom of a fictionalized aging Mexican caballero. The would-be idealism in "The Hyphen" aims to erase ethnic and racial boundaries, yet modern hyphenated Americans may find continued prejudice and the vagaries of history have rendered its rhetoric distinctly double-edged. Still, Wayne's love of country emanates from every track. Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but it's been graciously hospitable to Hollywood icons, from the Duke to Dutch Reagan. --Jerry McCulley"

This is my e-mail to Amazon's customer Support.

"I just read the official Amazon review of John Wayne's "America, Why I Love Her." The review, by Jerry McCulley, is more of an indictment of John Wayne and America than it is a review of the item. This sentence, "Marion Morrison, a.k.a. John Wayne and the Duke, remains an enduring symbol of America--a country with an endlessly conflicted legacy of largely improvised symbolism, national myths, revised-on-a-dime history, and the freedom to make a buck on effusive patriotic rhetoric." Says more about the authors bigoted predjudices and anti-american feelings than about the item itself. I expect this kind of pap from the unmoderated user reviews, not from Amazon itself.

I understand that Amazon is a large company and perhaps no one was able to review the review itself before using it. I'm sure Amazon can find a reviewer who can honestly review this item for potential customers without injecting their own leftist ideology and America-bashing into the review."